Ankle Fractures - What is a Trimalleolar Fracture And How Is It Treated?

Fishkill Injury Attorney Serving Myers Corner, Beacon, Lagrangeville and Nearby Areas of Hudson Valley

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Ankle Fractures: One of the most common and serious ankle fractures is called a trimalleolar fracture.  

A trimalleolar fracture is a fracture of the ankle that involves the lateral malleolus, medial malleolus and the distal posterior aspect of the tibia, which can be termed the posterior malleolus. The trauma is sometimes accompanied by ligament damage and dislocation.  The three aforementioned parts of bone articulate with the talus bone of the foot. Strictly speaking, there are only two malleoli (medial and lateral), but the term trimalleolar is used nevertheless.

A trimalleolar fracture usually requires surgery by an orthopedist who will repair the fracture using a plate and screws (internal fixation).  Not all ankle fractures are severely disabling.  However, a trimalleolar fracture can be quite disabling, involve an extended perior of recovery and can result in a limp in my experience.

Once the fracture heals, the surgeon may choose to remove the plate and screws if they are bothering the patient.  Otherwise, the plate and screws will be left in the patient permanently. For more information, watch our video on trimalleolar fractures.

If you or a loved one has been the victim of a serious injury or fatality, you may be entitled to compensation. Contact an experienced personal injury trial lawyer at The Maurer Law Firm, PLLC to schedule a free consultation to discuss your rights by filling out our free website "Tell Us About Your Case" review form, or phone us directly at 845- 896-5295.

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Posted by Ira M. Maurer, Esq. for The Maurer Law Firm, PLLC

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